Brainmoosh

thedsgnblog:

Anagrama    |    http://anagrama.com

"The logotype was inspired, mainly on traditions and rites performed in Mexico in the days before the Spanish Conquest. The names for some products such as the wine, mezcal and sauces were based on the same idea. The restaurant brand employs icons based on prehispanic tools used in the rites from that era. The color palette in Prehispánica is dark, representing the toughness of the era. At the same time, a silver foil is used on the logo printing a modern twist on the brand and its collateral.”

Anagrama is an international branding, architecture and software development firm with offices in Monterrey and Mexico City. Their clients include companies from varied industries in countries all around the world. They create the perfect balance between a design boutique and a business consultancy, from focusing on the development of creative pieces with the upmost attention to details, to providing perfect solutions based on the analysis of tangible data. 

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Yesterday I met another artist at the local hackerspace, and he said something that I didn’t understand, but I wished I did. I can’t quite remember. I understood it at the time to mean “Your lines are uncertain/unconfident, yet it looks clearly like you knew exactly what shape the creature would take.” it was about my sketch above. I wanted to dwell upon that concept, but more pressingly I explained that couldn’t be the case for this specific drawing, because it is a drawing from a dream, and is inherently not defined in shape.
I find that drawing from dream does not yield any visual “truth” (as I refer to it.) To know what this creature “looked” like is nearly impossible, by each sketch it contradicts it’s shape, from each “perceived” angle and moment in the dream, it contradicted itself, as any dream “concept” (as opposed to “image”) would. 
This sketch is my attempt at solidifying those many many looks into one concrete look. I favoured the leaned S like shape of the creature, but had to condense it’s silhouette to a smaller head rather than a larger, to meet the criteria of how realistic it seemed and other things, the sketch ended up far more feathered and bird like than it felt, being a creature of sand and wood chips. I do not know if it had a beak or not, or if it had a face or not, it did and didn’t. But this struggle of capturing “truthness” of the dream image results in very uncertain lines, was it like this, or this? I put vague lines until I solidify one idea. He was mistaken in his assumption that I “knew” what it would exactly look like. That raises the question to me, why does it look like I knew what I was doing?
But that brings me back to the other artist, who felt my entire sketchbook had this element of this line quality (or so I think he felt), and I feel restless about it. Unconfident lines is something I have heard much talk about in art schools, and my art tutors kept trying to communicate something about my sketch line quality to me that I also never understood. A quality they liked, but worried I would loose. I don’t see it, and it makes me feel a bit …empty? I don’t know.

Yesterday I met another artist at the local hackerspace, and he said something that I didn’t understand, but I wished I did. I can’t quite remember. I understood it at the time to mean “Your lines are uncertain/unconfident, yet it looks clearly like you knew exactly what shape the creature would take.” it was about my sketch above. I wanted to dwell upon that concept, but more pressingly I explained that couldn’t be the case for this specific drawing, because it is a drawing from a dream, and is inherently not defined in shape.

I find that drawing from dream does not yield any visual “truth” (as I refer to it.) To know what this creature “looked” like is nearly impossible, by each sketch it contradicts it’s shape, from each “perceived” angle and moment in the dream, it contradicted itself, as any dream “concept” (as opposed to “image”) would. 

This sketch is my attempt at solidifying those many many looks into one concrete look. I favoured the leaned S like shape of the creature, but had to condense it’s silhouette to a smaller head rather than a larger, to meet the criteria of how realistic it seemed and other things, the sketch ended up far more feathered and bird like than it felt, being a creature of sand and wood chips. I do not know if it had a beak or not, or if it had a face or not, it did and didn’t. But this struggle of capturing “truthness” of the dream image results in very uncertain lines, was it like this, or this? I put vague lines until I solidify one idea. He was mistaken in his assumption that I “knew” what it would exactly look like. That raises the question to me, why does it look like I knew what I was doing?

But that brings me back to the other artist, who felt my entire sketchbook had this element of this line quality (or so I think he felt), and I feel restless about it. Unconfident lines is something I have heard much talk about in art schools, and my art tutors kept trying to communicate something about my sketch line quality to me that I also never understood. A quality they liked, but worried I would loose. I don’t see it, and it makes me feel a bit …empty? I don’t know.

alpha-beta-gamer:

The Last Phoenix is a beautiful aerial combat adventure game where you control the last remaining Fire-bird who awakens to find the world rotting away. With the once vibrant world covered in ash and frost, you must master your abilities and fight against the decay, restoring the balance between life and death.

Exploring the world of The Last Phoenix is a joy, it really is a ridiculously beautiful place, a wonderfully crafted, vast decaying cityscape full of mystery.  As the phoenix flies through the environment, frost and ash are cleared away and vegetation regrows in real time, purifying the land permanently.   It features a Metroidvania style of exploration and discovery, and aerial combat against carrion and crows, with a variety of fire and light based attacks at your disposal.

Due for release on Steam this Fall, The Last Phoenix is well worth keeping an eye on (or both of them even).  It’s a visually stunning experience that will make your eyes extremely happy.

Download the Prototype, Free

Finally a flying game that isnt a either a flight sim/ boring airplanes/ bad

thequantumqueer:

nateswinehart:

Being good to each other is so important, guys.

that went to a weird place

quillusquillus:

maelgwyn:

Monument 
Based on the haunting imagery of this song and music video by Röyksopp & Robyn. I couldn’t get this image out of my head ‘til I stayed up way too late painting it. I’m very pleased that my nebula look more like nebula rather than just colorful clouds in space. Referenced heavily from this photo of M16, the eagle nebula.
Click here to go to my dA where I’ve uploaded the 2MB file for people to download! 

Wow beautiful arts, beautiful song!

quillusquillus:

maelgwyn:

Monument 

Based on the haunting imagery of this song and music video by Röyksopp & Robyn. I couldn’t get this image out of my head ‘til I stayed up way too late painting it. I’m very pleased that my nebula look more like nebula rather than just colorful clouds in space. Referenced heavily from this photo of M16, the eagle nebula.

Click here to go to my dA where I’ve uploaded the 2MB file for people to download! 

Wow beautiful arts, beautiful song!

Learning about Photoshop brushes. I have been feeling like i get less and less control over “Photoshop default brushes” yet all The pros tell you to stick to them. Every line i make with a default brush is painful and a chore. (Second pic) but this “bristle brush” (first pic) feels much nicer. It naturally adds texture, so i imagine shapes in The randomness of it. I guess i dont “create” that result, but if it’s faster iteration time, why not?

bedupolker:

stylized eevees

ivelas-the-wanderer:

[My fantastic friend blueskyfish drew a portrait of Ivelas and I absolutely love it! She’s a super cool person and you should totally commission her because she’s super cool like that. Did I mention she’s super cool? You can check out more of her work at www.SkyfishArt.com.]

ivelas-the-wanderer:

[My fantastic friend blueskyfish drew a portrait of Ivelas and I absolutely love it! She’s a super cool person and you should totally commission her because she’s super cool like that. Did I mention she’s super cool? You can check out more of her work at www.SkyfishArt.com.]

hideback:

Cicada, Stages of Conventionalization
Hugo Froelich, Keramic Studio Magazine, 1905

hideback:

Cicada, Stages of Conventionalization

Hugo Froelich, Keramic Studio Magazine, 1905